Level 6b water restrictions comes live in 1 day on 1st February 2018

According to the city of Cape Town:

The City of Cape Town has implemented Level 6B Water Restrictions, effective from
1 February 2018 until further notice.
RESTRICTIONS APPLICABLE TO ALL CUSTOMERS
 No watering/irrigation with municipal drinking water allowed. This includes watering/irrigation
of gardens, vegetables, agricultural crops, sports fields, golf courses, nurseries, parks and
other open spaces. Nurseries and customers involved in agricultural activities or with historical
gardens may apply for exemption. For more information, visit
www.capetown.gov.za/thinkwater.
 The use of borehole/wellpoint water for outdoor purposes, including garden use, topping up
of swimming pools and hosing down surfaces, is strongly discouraged in order to prevent the
depletion of aquifers in the current dire drought situation. Borehole/wellpoint water should
rather be used for toilet flushing.
 Should borehore/wellpoint water be used for garden irrigation, this must be limited to a
maximum of one hour only on Tuesdays and Saturdays before 09:00 or after 18:00.
 All City of Cape Town borehole and wellpoint users are expected to comply with all national
Department of Water and Sanitation regulations pertaining to borehole/wellpoint usage,
including the notice in Government Gazette No. 41381 (Vol. 631) of 12 January 2018.
Borehole/wellpoint water use must be metered and all users are required to keep records
and have these available for inspection.
 Permission from the national Department of Water and Sanitation is required in order to sell or
buy borehole/wellpoint water.
 All boreholes and wellpoints must be registered with the City and must display the official City
of Cape Town signage clearly visible from a public thoroughfare. Visit
www.capetown.gov.za/thinkwater for how to register.
 All properties where alternative, non-drinking water resources are used (including rainwater
harvesting, greywater, treated effluent water and spring water) must display signage to this
effect clearly visible from a public thoroughfare. Visit www.capetown.gov.za/thinkwater for
further information.
 No topping up (manual/automatic) filling or refilling of swimming pools with municipal
drinking water is allowed.
 All private swimming pools must be fitted with a cover.
 The use of portable or any temporary play pools is prohibited.
 No washing of vehicles (including taxis), trailers, caravans and boats with municipal drinking
water allowed. These must be washed with non-drinking water or cleaned with waterless
products or dry steam cleaning processes. This applies to all customers, including formal and
informal car washes.
 No washing or hosing down of hard-surfaced or paved areas with municipal drinking water
allowed. Users, such as abattoirs, food processing industries, care facilities, animal shelters
and other industries or facilities with special needs (health/safety related only) must apply for
exemption. For more information, visit www.capetown.gov.za/thinkwater.
 The use of municipal drinking water for ornamental water fountains or water features is
prohibited.
 Customers are strongly encouraged to install water efficient parts, fittings and technologies to
minimise water use at all taps, showerheads and other plumbing components.
LEVEL 6B WATER RESTRICTIONS
RESTRICTIONS APPLICABLE TO RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS
 All residents are required to use no more than 50 litres of municipal drinking water per person
per day in total irrespective of whether you are at home, work or elsewhere. Therefore, a
residential property with four occupants, for example, is expected to use at most 6 000 litres
per month.
 Single residential properties consuming more than 10 500 litres of municipal drinking water per
month will be prioritised for enforcement (see note 1). Properties where the number of
occupants necessitates higher consumption are encouraged to apply for an increase in
quota. For more information, visit www.capetown.gov.za/thinkwater.
 Cluster developments (flats and housing complexes) consuming more than 10 500 litres of
municipal drinking water per unit per month will be prioritised for enforcement (see note 1).
Cluster developments where the number of occupants necessitates higher consumption are
encouraged to apply for an increase in quota. For more information, visit
www.capetown.gov.za/thinkwater.
 You are encouraged to flush toilets (e.g. manually using a bucket) with greywater, rainwater
or other non-drinking water.
 No increase of the indigent water allocation over and above the free 350 litres a day will be
granted, unless through prior application and permission for specific events such as burial
ceremonies.
RESTRICTIONS APPLICABLE TO NON-RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMERS
 All non-residential properties (e.g. commercial and industrial properties, schools, clubs and
institutions) must ensure that their monthly consumption of municipal drinking water is
reduced by 45% compared to the corresponding period in 2015 (pre-drought). (See note 1
below.)
 All agricultural users must ensure that their monthly consumption of municipal drinking water is
reduced by 60% compared to the corresponding period in 2015 (pre-drought). (See note 1
below.)
 The operation of spray parks is prohibited.
 No new landscaping or sports fields may be established, except if irrigated only with nondrinking
water.
 For users supplied with water in terms of special contracts (notarial deeds, water service
intermediaries or water service providers), the contract conditions shall apply.
NOTE 1: Failure to comply will constitute an offence in terms of the City’s Water By-law, 2010 (or
as amended). The accused will be liable to an admission of guilt fine and, in accordance with
section 36(4), an installation of a water management device(s) at premises where the noncompliance
occurs. The cost thereof will be billed to the relevant account holder. Customers
with good reason for higher consumption need to provide the City with motivation to justify their
higher consumption.
Other restrictive measures, not detailed above, as stipulated in Schedule 1 of the Water By-law,
2010 (or as amended) still apply. Exemptions issued under Levels 4B, 5 and 6 restrictions still
apply, subject to review with the possibility of being revoked. Water pressure has been reduced
to limit consumption and water leaks, and such may cause intermittent water supply.

Fights already break out at water collection points

A fight broke out in Cape Town at one of the water springs and one person was arrested.
Apparently the fight broke out because of congestion and the neighborhood was not in the best of moods because of it.

This is long before even the Dayzero arrives. If people are already fighting about the water then we are up for a wild ride. This drought in Cape Town might just test the fabric of what Cape Town is really made of.

Imagine thousands of people standing in the hot sun just for a bit of water, there will be push ins, people will try and cut the queue and other problems.

Then there is the issue of parking, the reason it seems this fight broke out.

During the elections the whole country seems to be able to vote without major problems but getting that sort of organization for the water sources on a daily basis will not be that easy.

Not voting wont kill you but the lack of water definitely will.

Some shops in Cape Town are already left empty of their water stocks after people are chasing to the shops in order to buy the water and prepare for disaster and most probably a shtf scenario.

 

Business vs People, who will Cape Town choose to supply water to

If the feared Day zero comes and the drought that currently is on a rampage in Cape Town continues then apparently the city will switch off the water supply to Cape Town except in the CBD and commercial and industrial zones.

If that is true, does this mean the city of Cape Town is choosing to give water to business but not the actual citizens? Is this even a thing?

People say that the business sector and industrial areas dont use as much water as residential areas. If this is true then i suppose cutting off water from households and still supplying the water to businesses could make sense but makes you think.

Ordinary citizens will have no water while businesses continue as always. Isn’t that putting the people second?

 

Day zero is coming and there will be no water

What happens when Cape Town runs out of water? Has this ever happened?

No one knows how Easter island got wiped out although there are many theories. I’m not sure if anyone has ever checked if they had clear nice drinking water.

According to news around the globe, Cape Town will be the first city in the world to run out of water.

Apart from being thirsty I suppose the biggest problem there will be is sanitation. The stink would be unimaginable. The stink in squater camps will be even worse, people living so close to each other and no where for the shit to go.

Then there are the lines of people standing in queues to get water, if the queues get long enough what then? Will there be fights and riots?

Also to note is, it really is easy to go to the shop and just buy a bottle of water. The price might increase and a lot of people would still be able to afford it but then there are those that cant. What will they do?

I’m sure the city of Cape Town puts squaters first, before the tax paying citizens. You know like most disfunctional cities in today’s world does.

Squaters and poor people might suffer the worst though because they cant buy water or cooldrink obviously due to the lack of money and if these people have to stand in the queue for water it would not be because they have to flush their toilets, it would be because mostly probably they are thirsty. Hopefully this type of scenario wont happen but imagine standing in a queue because you can litterally find water nowhere or cant afford a cooldrink.

Then depending on the time of day, when these water queues will be who knows how hot it might be outside.

Sounds like a big mess. 3 days till anarchy is the rule.

 

Patricia de Lille and the Cape Town drought tax

Sure you might say now we need to have a drought tax for whatever thing you can come with.

Patricia de Lille went directly for the truth of why the city of Cape Town thinks we need to pay more tax. She said

The drought charge is needed to make up the deficit in the City’s revenue which has come about due to residents’ water savings and paying significantly less for water and sanitation.

So, because you use less water the city of Cape Town gets less money and now they have to increase the price to pay their bills.

She continues

The reality is that because of reduced consumption, the City’s Water and Sanitation Department has projected that it will see a deficit in the region of R1,7 billion for 2017/18.

Well then…

This is the fairest way to recover the City’s revenue shortfall by distributing the charge in such a way that those who can afford it will pay an amount based on their properties’ valuation.

Basically. You people that have houses and pay taxes will have to suffer because the city of Cape Town wants to give the shacks and people that come to Cape Town, pay no tax and live here, these people will obviously not pay a cent.
The hard working home owner will just have to pay the extra tax so that the city of Cape Town can continue to be a wellfare system.